What to do when my dog gets stung?

Yip! (Dog language for ouch!) Bee Sting! Now what?  Like people, dogs can react to insect stings in a number of ways.  Dogs who have not  been stung before or are allergic will react to the initial sting by licking or possibly limping. Relief can be as simple as applying a dab of baking soda mixed with a little water to the sting site.  Benadryl given at 1mg. per pound (1 Tab...
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Why is my pet losing weight?

  Weight loss can occur in our pets for a variety of reasons. Diet changes can cause weight change as all pet foods contain different calorie contents. One-half cup of one dry food may contain significantly more or less calories than the same volume of another. Switching from a dry to a canned pet food can also result in weight loss as canned food contains more water and less...
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My dog has another ear infection, can I use the leftover medication from the last one?

Ear infections in dogs can be caused by a variety of microbes, including many types of bacteria and/or yeast. Ear medications are all different, as some contain different antibiotics, anti-fungals, and anti-inflammatories.  If you are worried about infection, it is always best to have a veterinarian see your pet before medications are re-applied. Ear debris samples can be collected to help...
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Ask the Vet

The following articles by our doctors have been featured recently in the Hudson Hub. Please read and feel free to share this information with your friends! Featured topics: AAFCO Statement on Food Bags Aggressive Dog Part 1 Aggressive Dog Part 2 Anal Glands – How Often To Express? Antifreeze Dangers Arthritis  Avoiding Dog Bites Bee Stings A Bee Stung my Dog – Now What? Baby...
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Can my pet get human head lice?

The short answer is no.  Lice are species specific. That means that human lice affect humans and dog lice affect dogs. Dogs and cats have higher basal temperatures than people usually running at 101 to 102.5 degrees F.  Human lice don’t thrive at the higher temperature and don’t prefer cat and dog blood which they need to feed on. Your pets don’t need to be treated since the lice won’t...
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Do I need flea prevention for my indoor cat?

Many people try to save on pet care costs by omitting flea prevention on indoor cats. Unfortunately, some of the worst flea infestations I have seen are in households with indoor cats not on prevention. Fleas are everywhere; even living in our grass. Fleas can infest our indoor kitties by hitching a ride on our shoes, pants, or on dogs that enter the home. Unfortunately, only a couple fleas...
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How often should a dog’s anal glands be expressed?

As most dog owners know, dogs have anal sacs on either side of their rectum. These normally empty when a pet passes a bowel movement to add a scent to the stool – as if that is even necessary! If the dog has chronically soft stools or abnormal anal sacs, however, these sacs can become impacted, requiring expression. Affected dogs will scoot their bottoms on the ground and lick the area...
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My dog was stung by a bee. Should I be worried?

A Bee stings are common this time of year as our dogs spend more time outdoors. Most often, a bee sting will result in no significant complications. A cool compress, such as an ice pack wrapped in a towel, can be applied to the site for 5-10 minutes to help with pain and mild irritation. However, some pets have allergic reactions to bee stings.  The most common sign of a reaction in pets is...
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Where Exactly Do Ticks Hang Out?

A Ticks are everywhere this year. These ugly insects are blood feeders and are unfortunately capable of transmitting some serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease, to people and dogs alike. Ticks are most often found on low lying vegetation – such as fields of tall grass or low plant life in the woods. They spend their adult lives hanging on to leaves with their ‘arms’ outstretched waiting for a...
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Q How Do I Help My Dog with Fear of Storms?

    A Many dogs (and some cats) have anxiety or even outright panic during thunderstorms.  Usually, the fear response becomes more obvious as the dog moves through middle-age.  Common signs of anxiety including hiding, whining, panting, pacing, and even destructive behavior. Behavioral modification and reassurance may be enough to bring some calming affects; however,...
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